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Is Red Meat Killing You?
A new study published yesterday in the Archives of Internal Medicine found that eating red meat—any amount and any type—raises the risk of early death.
Through “food frequency questionnaires” (with questions like “How often, on average, do you consume beef, pork or lamb as a main dish?”) sent every other year, researchers examined the eating habits of 37,698 men and 83,644 women, all of whom were healthcare professionals and in good health.
After collecting data for more than 20 years, researchers found that eating one serving per day of unprocessed red meat (like fresh beef, pork and lamb) raises your risk of death by 13% while the processed stuff (meat that’s been frozen, canned, or altered, like sausage and bologna) raises it by 20%. Bacon and hot dogs are the worst offenders.
Researchers link the saturated fat, iron, and cholesterol content in red meat to heart problems, including fatal coronary heart disease. Although both processed and unprocessed red meats have similar amounts of saturated fat and iron, processed meat is far worse health-wise.
Since processed meats go through a preservation process, they contain nitrites and nitrates. Although nitrates are relatively non toxic, in the body they are converted into nitrites, which have been shown to impair insulin response and are possible carcinogens. Plus, higher levels of sodium in processed meats can raise blood pressure—and the  risk of heart problems.
If you can’t bear the thought of a steak-less future, stick with unprocessed meats and don’t eat red meat more than two or three times a week, researchers say.
Better yet, swap red meat with a healthier protein source. The study also found that replacing one serving of red meat with one serving of fish lowers your risk of early death by 7%, poultry drops it by 14%, nuts by 19%, whole grains by 14%, and legumes and low fat dairy by 10%. Try them all in these beef-free, protein-packed recipes!
Almond-Crusted Chicken BreastsQuinoa and Salmon SaladCurried Lentils and CauliflowerSpicy Shrimp and Black Bean EnchiladasSpaghetti Fra Diavolo with Chicken Meatballs
More from WH: Healthy Vegetarian Recipes Myths About Vegetarian Foods The Healthiest Fish
photo: iStockphoto/Thinkstock

Is Red Meat Killing You?

A new study published yesterday in the Archives of Internal Medicine found that eating red meatany amount and any type—raises the risk of early death.

Through “food frequency questionnaires” (with questions like “How often, on average, do you consume beef, pork or lamb as a main dish?”) sent every other year, researchers examined the eating habits of 37,698 men and 83,644 women, all of whom were healthcare professionals and in good health.

After collecting data for more than 20 years, researchers found that eating one serving per day of unprocessed red meat (like fresh beef, pork and lamb) raises your risk of death by 13% while the processed stuff (meat that’s been frozen, canned, or altered, like sausage and bologna) raises it by 20%. Bacon and hot dogs are the worst offenders.

Researchers link the saturated fat, iron, and cholesterol content in red meat to heart problems, including fatal coronary heart disease. Although both processed and unprocessed red meats have similar amounts of saturated fat and iron, processed meat is far worse health-wise.

Since processed meats go through a preservation process, they contain nitrites and nitrates. Although nitrates are relatively non toxic, in the body they are converted into nitrites, which have been shown to impair insulin response and are possible carcinogens. Plus, higher levels of sodium in processed meats can raise blood pressure—and the  risk of heart problems.

If you can’t bear the thought of a steak-less future, stick with unprocessed meats and don’t eat red meat more than two or three times a week, researchers say.

Better yet, swap red meat with a healthier protein source. The study also found that replacing one serving of red meat with one serving of fish lowers your risk of early death by 7%, poultry drops it by 14%, nuts by 19%, whole grains by 14%, and legumes and low fat dairy by 10%. Try them all in these beef-free, protein-packed recipes!

Almond-Crusted Chicken Breasts
Quinoa and Salmon Salad
Curried Lentils and Cauliflower
Spicy Shrimp and Black Bean Enchiladas
Spaghetti Fra Diavolo with Chicken Meatballs

More from WH:
Healthy Vegetarian Recipes

Myths About Vegetarian Foods

The Healthiest Fish

photo: iStockphoto/Thinkstock
Homemade Soda Recipes!
There are plenty of health reasons to avoid drinking soda—but that hasn’t stopped the average American from swigging 44.7 gallons of the stuff a year. Here’s a delicious sub: DIY bubbly drinks with gourmet flavors you won’t find in a store. They’re easy to make, and each of the following has just 120 calories (or less) per serving.
Pineapple Rosemary Ginger Soda
Cherry Vanilla Soda
Orange Mango Strawberry Soda
Sarsaparilla Root Beer
Raspberry-Lime Rickey
Watermelon-Mint Pop With a Kick
Pomegranate-Cranberry Soda

Homemade Soda Recipes!

There are plenty of health reasons to avoid drinking soda—but that hasn’t stopped the average American from swigging 44.7 gallons of the stuff a year. Here’s a delicious sub: DIY bubbly drinks with gourmet flavors you won’t find in a store. They’re easy to make, and each of the following has just 120 calories (or less) per serving.

Pineapple Rosemary Ginger Soda

Cherry Vanilla Soda

Orange Mango Strawberry Soda

Sarsaparilla Root Beer

Raspberry-Lime Rickey

Watermelon-Mint Pop With a Kick

Pomegranate-Cranberry Soda

Meatless Monday: Satisfying Post-Workout Meal Ideas
By Hollis Templeton
While I love the energy and mood boost I get from amping up my  exercise routine, an unfortunate side effect of sticking to those New  Year’s resolutions is the increased hunger that comes with longer,  harder workouts. What’s really not fair: Researchers at the University  of Ottawa in Canada found that while intense exercise suppresses men’s  appetites, vigorous workouts make women hungrier. Humph.
While it’s tempting to satisfy a grumbling stomach with a big  breakfast or dinner post-workout (you earned it, right?), you don’t want  to erase your hard work with a calorie-packed meal that’s low on  nutrients. Instead, pick a breakfast or dinner that includes a mix of  carbohydrates (to replenish energy stores), protein (to aid muscle  recovery and repair), and healthy fat (to help you stay full). Here, six  meat-free meal options to try on your workout days this week.
 Magic Lasagna (pictured) Why magic? It’s a breeze to prepare thanks to no-boil noodles. Plus it’s loaded with veggies.
Toasted Egg and Cheese Sandwich At last, a breakfast sandwich sans bacon. This one’s got garlic and  herb cheese, egg whites, and avocado all for less than 400 calories.
High Protein Blueberry Yogurt Smoothie A fruity and filling blend you can sip on your way to class or work.
Pumped Up Banana-Pecan Oatmeal Potassium-rich bananas and muscle-building whey protein give you the oomph you need to recover after your last set. For Evening Exercisers
Lentil-Quinoa Burgers with Sautéed Mushrooms With the surprisingly meaty flavors in these vegetarian burgers, you definitely won’t miss the meat!
Indian Vegetables with Baked Tempeh When you’re craving something a little exotic, hold back from grabbing  take-out. Try Indian at home with this easy protein-packed dish that has  less than 325 calories per serving.
photo: Ann Stratton

Meatless Monday: Satisfying Post-Workout Meal Ideas

By Hollis Templeton

While I love the energy and mood boost I get from amping up my exercise routine, an unfortunate side effect of sticking to those New Year’s resolutions is the increased hunger that comes with longer, harder workouts. What’s really not fair: Researchers at the University of Ottawa in Canada found that while intense exercise suppresses men’s appetites, vigorous workouts make women hungrier. Humph.

While it’s tempting to satisfy a grumbling stomach with a big breakfast or dinner post-workout (you earned it, right?), you don’t want to erase your hard work with a calorie-packed meal that’s low on nutrients. Instead, pick a breakfast or dinner that includes a mix of carbohydrates (to replenish energy stores), protein (to aid muscle recovery and repair), and healthy fat (to help you stay full). Here, six meat-free meal options to try on your workout days this week.

 Magic Lasagna (pictured) Why magic? It’s a breeze to prepare thanks to no-boil noodles. Plus it’s loaded with veggies.

Toasted Egg and Cheese Sandwich At last, a breakfast sandwich sans bacon. This one’s got garlic and herb cheese, egg whites, and avocado all for less than 400 calories.

High Protein Blueberry Yogurt Smoothie A fruity and filling blend you can sip on your way to class or work.

Pumped Up Banana-Pecan Oatmeal Potassium-rich bananas and muscle-building whey protein give you the oomph you need to recover after your last set.
For Evening Exercisers

Lentil-Quinoa Burgers with Sautéed Mushrooms With the surprisingly meaty flavors in these vegetarian burgers, you definitely won’t miss the meat!

Indian Vegetables with Baked Tempeh When you’re craving something a little exotic, hold back from grabbing take-out. Try Indian at home with this easy protein-packed dish that has less than 325 calories per serving.

photo: Ann Stratton
Seared Scallops with Bacon, White Beans, and Spinach 
Scallops are an awesome source of lean protein, and are  ridiculously easy to cook (around 6 minutes per scallop!). Combine them  with white beans, spinach, and the secret flavor-packed ingredient,  bacon, and you have a delicious dinner in a flash.
P.S. We (the we behind this Tumblr) have made this recipe and IT IS DELICIOUS.

Seared Scallops with Bacon, White Beans, and Spinach

Scallops are an awesome source of lean protein, and are ridiculously easy to cook (around 6 minutes per scallop!). Combine them with white beans, spinach, and the secret flavor-packed ingredient, bacon, and you have a delicious dinner in a flash.

P.S. We (the we behind this Tumblr) have made this recipe and IT IS DELICIOUS.

Want to eat better this year? Here’s an ENTIRE WEEK of healthy meals, snacks, and deserts! (And even more tasty recipes at the bottom.) 
Just want to print the whole thing? No problem: Here’s the one-week meal plan.
New Year, New You: Do you want to lose 5, 10, or 20+ pounds? Tone up? Start running? We’ve  made 4-week workout plans to help you achieve your goals! Get your New Year’s Resolution plan now!

Want to eat better this year? Here’s an ENTIRE WEEK of healthy meals, snacks, and deserts! (And even more tasty recipes at the bottom.)

Just want to print the whole thing? No problem: Here’s the one-week meal plan.

New Year, New You: Do you want to lose 5, 10, or 20+ pounds? Tone up? Start running? We’ve made 4-week workout plans to help you achieve your goals! Get your New Year’s Resolution plan now!

Meatless Monday: Holiday Party Foods
By Hollis Templeton
While holidays at my house revolve around tiny traditions, like saving one meaningful  or homemade gift for after dinner and watching National Lampoons  Christmas Vacation until everyone’s asleep, one thing that never stays  the same is the food. My dad, the cook and party planner of the family,  picks cuisines from outside of our own culture and bases holiday meals  around a different one each year. A traditional Jewish breakfast on  Christmas morning, Italian-inspired Christmas Eve appetizers, a French-style holiday dinner—you never really know what’s coming.
Looking for a way to liven up your traditions this year? Keep your  guests on their toes by swapping all-too-expected standards—a bagel  breakfast, Waldorf salad at dinner, cookies for dessert—for tasty  meat-free treats. Try the five easy recipes below for festive foods that  will please vegetarians and omnivores alike.
Fruit Crepes with Chocolate Sauce On Christmas morning, skip boring bagels and cream cheese and whip up light and fluffy crepes filled with red and green fruit.
Potato Pancakes Over Baby Greens (pictured) Lighten up your latkes by opting for egg whites and serving the Hanukkah favorite with a small salad.
 Spinach Cranberry Salad with Toasted Walnuts and Berry Vinaigrette This red and green, savory and sweet salad will add color and crunch to any holiday table.
Goat Cheese Skewers Simply stack cheese, basil, and tomatoes and you’ve got a party snack in minutes.
Ginger-Macadamia Nut Cheesecake with Praline Topping If your dessert motto is “go big or go home,” impress guests with this anything-but-ordinary cheesecake.

Photo: Elizabeth Watt/Thinkstock

Meatless Monday: Holiday Party Foods

By Hollis Templeton

While holidays at my house revolve around tiny traditions, like saving one meaningful or homemade gift for after dinner and watching National Lampoons Christmas Vacation until everyone’s asleep, one thing that never stays the same is the food. My dad, the cook and party planner of the family, picks cuisines from outside of our own culture and bases holiday meals around a different one each year. A traditional Jewish breakfast on Christmas morning, Italian-inspired Christmas Eve appetizers, a French-style holiday dinner—you never really know what’s coming.

Looking for a way to liven up your traditions this year? Keep your guests on their toes by swapping all-too-expected standards—a bagel breakfast, Waldorf salad at dinner, cookies for dessert—for tasty meat-free treats. Try the five easy recipes below for festive foods that will please vegetarians and omnivores alike.

Fruit Crepes with Chocolate Sauce On Christmas morning, skip boring bagels and cream cheese and whip up light and fluffy crepes filled with red and green fruit.

Potato Pancakes Over Baby Greens (pictured) Lighten up your latkes by opting for egg whites and serving the Hanukkah favorite with a small salad.

 Spinach Cranberry Salad with Toasted Walnuts and Berry Vinaigrette This red and green, savory and sweet salad will add color and crunch to any holiday table.

Goat Cheese Skewers Simply stack cheese, basil, and tomatoes and you’ve got a party snack in minutes.

Ginger-Macadamia Nut Cheesecake with Praline Topping If your dessert motto is “go big or go home,” impress guests with this anything-but-ordinary cheesecake.

Photo: Elizabeth Watt/Thinkstock

The 125 Best Packaged Foods for Women (AKA grocery list makeover)
It’s likely that more than half of your grocery budget goes to foods that come in a bag, box, or can. But scan a typical ingredients panel and you’ll see that what you’re really paying for is a lot of added fat, sodium, and chemical preservatives.
To help you get more nutritional bang for your buck, our team of pros did a supermarket sweep for the buys that are as beneficial for you as they are for your wallet. Our list is broken down into categories like breads & cereals, frozen meals, condiments, pasta & rice, drinks, and dairy. Get shopping!
#23: Popcorn, Indiana All-Natural Cinnamon Sugar Kettlecorn  All the hot-buttered satisfaction of carnival kettlecorn in five  simple ingredients, with no preservatives and just a hint of  tongue-tingling flavor. Per serving (2 1/2 cups): 130 calories, 4.5 g fat (0 g sat), 21 g carbs, 115 mg sodium, 2 g fiber, 1 g protein, 7 g sugar
Print the whole list of the 125 best packaged foods!
Photo: Mitchell Feinberg

The 125 Best Packaged Foods for Women (AKA grocery list makeover)

It’s likely that more than half of your grocery budget goes to foods that come in a bag, box, or can. But scan a typical ingredients panel and you’ll see that what you’re really paying for is a lot of added fat, sodium, and chemical preservatives.

To help you get more nutritional bang for your buck, our team of pros did a supermarket sweep for the buys that are as beneficial for you as they are for your wallet. Our list is broken down into categories like breads & cereals, frozen meals, condiments, pasta & rice, drinks, and dairy. Get shopping!

#23: Popcorn, Indiana All-Natural Cinnamon Sugar Kettlecorn
All the hot-buttered satisfaction of carnival kettlecorn in five simple ingredients, with no preservatives and just a hint of tongue-tingling flavor.
Per serving (2 1/2 cups): 130 calories, 4.5 g fat (0 g sat), 21 g carbs, 115 mg sodium, 2 g fiber, 1 g protein, 7 g sugar

Print the whole list of the 125 best packaged foods!

Photo: Mitchell Feinberg